Department of Psychology: Psychology in the Public Interest
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Psychology in the Public Interest

The Psychology in the Public Interest (PSP) program focuses on using psychological and other social science theory and methods to analyze and ameliorate important social and organizational problems. Issues related to community psychology, human systems development, social inequality, and innovation and technology are a major focus for the program. Topics addressed include: prevention, evaluation of intervention programs, workforce development; technology transfer and adaptation, empowering individuals, groups and communities, race/ethnicity and gender, and international development. Action oriented methods are emphasized and guided, not by disciplinary considerations research and alone, but also by a pragmatic desire to produce knowledge and solutions that serve the public interest.

The Psychology in the Public Interest program awards the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology. All Psychology in the Public Interest students are expected to work towards the Ph.D. degree.

Graduates of the Psychology in the Public Interest program are employed in academic, community programs, public health agencies, industry, research and developments settings; government at local, state and national levels; and international institutions. They are teachers, researchers, consultants, program directors, and leaders in organizations and communities.

Brochure

Psychology in the Public Interest Program Brochure

The Psychology in the Public Interest Program Brochure provides contact information, a general description of the program, lists required and elective graduate courses, and lists the faculty and their research interests.